Contact Lenses

Multifocal Contact Lenses

In the ever-evolving world of vision correction, multifocal contact lenses have emerged as a game-changer for individuals seeking a seamless solution to address their presbyopia. As you navigate through life's various stages, your eyes may undergo changes that can impact your ability to focus clearly on objects at different distances. Multifocal contact lenses offer a convenient and effective way to combat this challenge, providing you with a versatile and comfortable option for correcting your vision.
 

What Are Multifocal Contact Lenses?

 

Multifocal contact lenses are specialized lenses designed to correct presbyopia, a condition that typically occurs as you age, making it difficult to focus on near objects. Unlike traditional single-vision lenses that correct either near or distance vision, multifocal contact lenses incorporate multiple prescriptions into a single lens. This innovative design allows you to enjoy clear vision at various distances, eliminating the need for separate reading glasses or bifocals.
 

How Do Multifocal Contact Lenses Work?

 

Multifocal contact lenses employ advanced optical technologies to provide seamless vision correction. These lenses feature distinct zones or concentric rings that correspond to different prescriptions for near, intermediate, and distance vision. As your eyes move and focus on objects at varying distances, the appropriate zone of the lens comes into play, ensuring a clear and comfortable visual experience.

There are two main types of multifocal contact lens designs:

  • Simultaneous Vision Design: In this design, the lens incorporates multiple prescriptions simultaneously, allowing your eyes to utilize the appropriate zone based on the viewing distance. This design can take some time to adjust to, as your brain learns to interpret the different visual inputs.

  • Alternating Vision Design: Also known as "segmented" or "translating" lenses, these lenses have distinct zones for near and distance vision. As you move your eyes or shift your gaze, the appropriate zone is positioned in front of your pupil, providing the necessary correction.


 

Eye Conditions That Multifocal Contact Lenses Can Treat

 

Multifocal contact lenses are primarily designed to address the following vision-related conditions:
 

  • Presbyopia: As you age, the natural lenses in your eyes lose flexibility, making it challenging to focus on nearby objects. Multifocal contact lenses can correct this age-related farsightedness, allowing you to see clearly at all distances.

  • Myopia (Nearsightedness): If you struggle to see distant objects clearly, multifocal contact lenses can incorporate a prescription to correct myopia, while also providing near and intermediate vision correction.

  • Hyperopia (Farsightedness): For individuals with farsightedness, multifocal contact lenses can offer a solution by incorporating a prescription to improve distance vision, along with near and intermediate vision correction.

  • Astigmatism: Some multifocal contact lenses are designed to correct astigmatism, a condition caused by an irregularly shaped cornea or lens, resulting in blurred or distorted vision.


Post-Surgical Contact Lenses

If you have recently undergone eye surgery, your eye doctor may recommend the use of post-surgical contact lenses as part of your recovery process. These specialized lenses are designed to aid in the healing and protection of your eyes after surgery.
 

Why Post-Surgical Contact Lenses May Be Necessary

 

After eye surgery, your eyes are in a delicate state and require extra care to ensure proper healing. Post-surgical contact lenses can play a crucial role in this process. These lenses act as a protective barrier, shielding your eyes from irritants such as dust, debris, and bright lights. They also help to maintain the shape of the cornea and aid in the prevention of infection. By wearing post-surgical contact lenses, you can minimize the risk of complications and promote a faster and smoother recovery.
 

Different Types of Post-Surgical Contact Lenses

 

There are various types of post-surgical contact lenses available, and the specific type recommended for you will depend on the nature of your surgery and your eye condition. One common type is the bandage contact lens, which is a soft, therapeutic lens that covers the cornea, providing protection and promoting healing.
 

Another type is scleral lenses, which is larger and covers a larger portion of the eye, providing enhanced protection and support. Your optometrist will determine the most suitable type of post-surgical contact lens for your individual needs.


Colored Contacts

Colored contacts have become increasingly popular over the years as a way to enhance your look and experiment with different eye colors. Whether you want to change your eye color for a special occasion or simply for everyday wear, colored contacts offer a fun and versatile option.
 

Different Types of Colored Contacts

 

When it comes to colored contacts, there are various types to choose from, depending on your preferences and needs. The three main categories are cosmetic, enhancement, and opaque lenses.
 

Cosmetic lenses are designed to completely change the color of your eyes. These lenses come in a wide range of shades, from natural hues such as blue, green, and brown, to more vibrant colors like purple, gray, and even red. Cosmetic lenses can create a dramatic transformation and give you the eye color you desire.
 

Enhancement lenses, on the other hand, are designed to enhance your natural eye color rather than change it completely. They add depth and intensity to your eyes, making them appear brighter and more vibrant. Enhancement lenses are ideal if you want a subtle change that enhances your natural beauty.
 

Opaque lenses are specifically designed to cover dark-colored eyes. They are ideal for individuals with naturally dark eyes who want to achieve a lighter or more vibrant eye color. Opaque lenses are often used in theatrical or costume applications as they can create a striking and captivating look.


Types of Daily Contact Lenses

Wearing contact lenses gives patients the flexibility and freedom to live life to the fullest, without some of the difficulties presented by wearing glasses. Many people who choose contact lenses do so because they don’t like the way that glasses look or feel, or because wearing glasses compromises their ability to perform certain tasks or activities, such as sports or jobs that require the use of safety goggles. 

There are lots of different contact lenses to choose from, with two of the most popular being daily disposables and toric lenses. 
 

Disposable Lenses

As their name suggests, these daily contact lenses are disposable. This means that they can and should be discarded at the end of each day rather than re-worn. Disposable lenses do tend to be a little more expensive than some repeat-wear varieties, but the benefits usually outweigh the cost. 

Some of the advantages of choosing daily disposable contact lenses include:

  • You don’t have to clean them, which saves patients a great deal of time and hassle. It also helps save money in terms of the ongoing cost of cleaning solution. 

  • Disposable lenses are also great for people with eye allergies. This is because with ordinary lenses, there’s an opportunity for deposits and microorganisms to build up. With daily disposables, allergens have less chance to attach themselves to the lenses and cause irritation and other allergy symptoms. 

  • You don’t need to schedule regular replacements either, which makes wearing contact lenses easier on your schedule. 

  • Disposable contact lenses are particularly good for people who have busy lives and are likely to cut corners when it comes to caring for their eyes or contacts since there is no cleaning or maintenance required.


Daily disposable contact lenses are available in a wide range of prescriptions, including those for patients with nearsightedness and farsightedness. Your eye doctor will be able to advise you if you are a candidate for disposable contact lenses. 
 

Toric Lenses

Toric contact lenses are recommended for patients who have a refractive eye problem called astigmatism. Patients with astigmatism have corneal abnormalities that cause the refraction of the eye to be different between the vertical and horizontal planes, causing blurred vision and difficulty seeing fine details. Toric contact lenses are shaped in a particular way that creates the different focusing powers needed in each part of the lens to correct your vision. For this reason, it’s essential that Toric lenses are placed into the eyes in the correct position.

Fortunately, manufacturers design Toric lenses with features that help them to stay in place, including:

  • Thin/thick zones

  • Creating areas of the lens that are thicker or heavier which helps secure it in position 

  • An area where the bottom of the lens is slightly cut off 


To keep them stable, Toric lenses are a little firmer than conventional soft lenses. This means that some patients can find them a little less comfortable, but the superior vision they obtain outweighs this. Your eye doctor will be able to advise you if you are a good candidate for Toric contact lenses and which variety would best suit you. 

To find out more about daily contact lenses, speak to our friendly and knowledgeable team. 


Specialty Contact Lenses

Every patient is different and so are their eyes. This means that there need to be different types of contact lenses to suit each individual. Some patients have corneal abnormalities which mean that conventional lenses won’t sit comfortably on the surface of their eyes, while others suffer from eye conditions that mean normal contact lenses won’t be comfortable or could irritate their eyes. 

As you may have guessed from the name, specialty contact lenses are unconventional contacts that are designed for patients that regular contacts might not be suitable. Here are some of the main types of speciality contact lenses and who they are recommended for. 
 

Who might be a good patient for specialty contact lenses?

 

Some of the patients that might benefit from specialty contact lenses include those who:

  • have been diagnosed with dry eye syndrome

  • have corneal scarring

  • have been diagnosed with keratoconus, a condition characterized by the bulging of the cornea

  • suffer from strabismus, a condition where the patient has an eye that turns in or out relative to the other

  • have suffered an injury to the eye

  • suffer from a peripheral corneal thinning disorder

  • are intolerant to other types of lenses


Your eye doctor or contact lens provider will be able to tell you if you need specialty contact lenses and if so, which lenses would be best based on your individual requirements. 
 


Hybrid Contacts

Contact lenses have become a popular choice for individuals who want to correct their vision without the hassle of wearing glasses. Traditional contact lenses have been around for decades, offering a convenient alternative to eyeglasses. However, advancements in technology have given rise to a new type of contact lens – hybrid contacts.
 

What Are Hybrid Contacts?

 

Hybrid contacts are a revolutionary type of contact lens that combine the best features of both soft and rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses. The rigid center corrects vision by providing precise clarity, while the soft skirt offers comfort and stability. This unique combination allows for the benefits of both types of lenses to be experienced simultaneously.
 

The central RGP lens of a hybrid contact is made from a rigid material that allows oxygen to pass through to the cornea, ensuring ample oxygen supply to the eyes. This ensures the overall health of the eyes, preventing dryness and reducing the risk of complications associated with limited oxygen flow


Keratoconus and Your Treatment Options

Keratoconus can be a disturbing diagnosis to those who have experienced it. To compound issues, many patients complain that they had poor initial treatment due to a lack of understanding about the disease. If proper treatment is not achieved, individuals may experience a rapid deterioration in their ability to see. This leads to a reduced quality of life. You can reduce the stress related to a keratoconus diagnosis and increase the benefits of treatment by understanding your treatment options.
 

Understanding Keratoconus

Keratoconus is an eye disease that causes the cornea to thin and bulge. This bulge generally takes on the appearance of a cone. As light enters the eye, it becomes distorted by the cone causing vision abnormalities.

Modern research is connecting keratoconus with an enzyme imbalance in the cornea. This imbalance leaves the eye susceptible to oxidative free radicals. Keratoconus has also been linked to UV damage, excessive eye rubbing, poorly fitting contacts, and chronic eye irritation.
 

Treatment Options

While your eye professional will have the best understanding of what treatment option is right for you, we have compiled ten of the most common treatments here.

  • Corneal Cross-linking (CXL) – There are two different types of this procedure, but they both introduce riboflavin to the cornea in order to strengthen the corneal tissue and stop the bulging from progressing.

  • Custom Soft Contact Lenses – Soft contacts are generally more comfortable to wear than gas permeable lenses. Recently, some contact companies have been able to create a contact specifically to correct the issues related to mild and moderate cases of keratoconus.

  • Gas Permeable Contact Lenses – Gas permeable lenses are a hard contact lens that physically forces the eye to adhere to the lens shape. This allows for the correction of keratoconus. The fit is often time-consuming and may take several different lenses to achieve the proper fit.

  • Piggybacking Contact Lenses – This method is used for individuals who require a gas permeable lens but cannot tolerate wearing rigid contacts. Piggybacking utilizes a soft lens placed on the eye first, and then a gas permeable lens is placed over the top. This offers the comfort of soft contacts with the rigidity and clarity of the gas permeable lenses.

  • Hybrid Contact Lenses – Hybrid contact lenses were designed specifically for keratoconus. This technology blends a rigid contact lens center with a softer edge, or skirt, of the contact

  • Scleral and Semi-Scleral lenses – These lenses are gas permeable lenses but cover a larger area of the eye than a standard rigid lens. These lenses don’t put pressure onto the cone shape of the eye. The reduced pressure results in a more comfortable fit for patients.

  • Prosthetic Lenses – This lens is used specifically for patients that have very advanced keratoconus and have ruled out other options. The advanced scleral lens also doubles as a protective prosthetic shell. There are special requirements to qualify for this lens though, so check with your eye care professional if this is an option for you.