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Neurolens

Neurolens are the first and only prescription lenses that include an element of contoured prism in their design. This prism is designed to bring the patient’s eyes into more equal alignment, and this should help to provide relief from the symptoms that are associated with several eye misalignment conditions, including digital eye strain and binocular vision dysfunction.
 

What is digital eye strain?

Digital eye strain is the name given to describe a group of symptoms that can occur when someone spends long periods of time using digital devices. Since using digital devices requires the eyes to work harder than normal and we don’t always position our devices the perfect distance away, it can lead to issues such as eye pain, dry and irritated eyes, eye fatigue, light sensitivity and blurred vision. Unsurprisingly, the number of people who are experiencing digital eye strain has grown significantly over the last few years and is expected to continue to do so.

 

What is binocular vision dysfunction?

Binocular vision dysfunction, also known as BVD for short, is another eye condition but is one that is very misunderstood. Binocular vision dysfunction occurs when the eyes aren’t perfectly aligned, causing your brain and eyes to work harder than normal in order to create a clear visual image and remain focused. This places pressure on the trigeminal nerve, which is the nerve that is responsible for the majority of the sensations that we experience in our head and back. BVD can often manifest as other things owing to the huge range of symptoms that are associated with the condition. These can include, but aren’t limited to:

  • Blurred vision

  • Headaches/migraines

  • Double vision

  • Motion sickness

  • Vertigo

  • Dizziness

  • Anxiety

 

Many people don’t think to visit an eye doctor when they are experiencing these symptoms, but all can occur simply because the eyes are out of alignment.

 

What are Neurolens lenses and how do they help?

As well as containing your usual prescription, Neurolens lenses also contain a specific amount of contoured micro-prism. This micro-prism alters the position of images so that they are aligned in the same plane. This then reduces the pressure on the muscles around the eyes as well as bringing the eyes into alignment, easing the symptoms that the patient has been experiencing.

The amount of prism in Neurolens lenses is decided using the Neurolens eye-tracking device. This non-invasively measures the misalignment that the patient is experiencing, and this is used to form the basis for the patient’s Neurolens prescription. After this, it’s fairly normal for the amount of prism to need to be adjusted by infinitesimal amounts to achieve the optimal relief from your symptoms. Most patients who choose Neurolens treatment see a 50% improvement in their vision as soon as they start to have micro-prism incorporated into their prescription lenses. However, with careful adjustments, many patients see as much as an 80% reduction in the effects of digital eye strain and binocular vision dysfunction.

Want more information about Neurolens? Please contact our knowledgeable eye care specialists.  


Cataract Surgery Co-Management

Cataracts are a common eye condition that can significantly affect your vision. They occur when the lens of your eye becomes cloudy, causing blurred or distorted vision. This clouding is typically a result of aging, but other factors such as genetics, diabetes, or prolonged exposure to sunlight can also contribute to the development of cataracts.
 

As cataracts progress, you may experience symptoms such as difficulty seeing at night, increased sensitivity to glare, or a decrease in color perception. These changes can make daily activities like reading, driving, or recognizing faces more challenging.
 

Why Cataract Surgery May be Necessary

 

Cataract surgery is often recommended when cataracts start to interfere with your vision and affect your ability to perform daily tasks. The primary goal of cataract surgery is to remove the cloudy lens and replace it with an artificial intraocular lens (IOL).
 

The decision to undergo cataract surgery is a personal one and should be made after consulting with your optometrist. Factors such as the severity of your cataracts, your overall eye health, and your lifestyle requirements will be taken into consideration when determining if surgery is necessary.
 

What is Cataract Surgery Co-Management?

 

Cataract surgery co-management refers to the collaborative approach between an ophthalmologist, who performs the surgery, and an optometrist, who provides pre-operative and post-operative care. This partnership ensures that you receive comprehensive eye care throughout the entire process, from the initial consultation to the final follow-up appointments.
 

Your optometrist plays a crucial role in cataract surgery co-management by conducting a thorough pre-operative evaluation to assess your overall eye health and determine the most suitable IOL for your specific needs. They will also provide guidance and education on the surgical procedure, address any concerns you may have, and help you make informed decisions about your eye care.


Retinal Imaging Testing

When it comes to maintaining your eye health, regular check-ups and screenings play a crucial role. One such screening method that has revolutionized the field of optometry is retinal imaging testing. This non-invasive procedure allows optometrists to capture detailed images of the retina, providing valuable insights into the overall health of your eyes.

 

The Importance of Retinal Imaging Testing

 

By examining the retina, which is the thin layer of tissue at the back of your eye responsible for capturing light and transmitting visual signals to the brain, optometrists can gain valuable insights into your eye health. Retinal imaging testing allows for the early detection of various eye conditions even before noticeable symptoms occur. This early detection is crucial as it enables prompt treatment and intervention, potentially preventing irreversible vision loss.
 

Advanced Retinal Imaging Technology

 

Retinal imaging testing has been made possible by the advancements in technology, specifically Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Optos imaging. OCT is a non-invasive imaging technique that uses light waves to capture high-resolution cross-sectional images of the retina. It provides detailed information about the layers of the retina, helping eye doctors identify and monitor various eye conditions.
 

Optos imaging utilizes ultra-widefield retinal technology to capture a panoramic image of the retina. This technology allows for a more comprehensive view of the retina, including the periphery. Dilating drops are not necessary with Optos, making the process more convenient for patients.


Lipiflow

Dry eyes are one of the most common conditions that can affect our eyes and is estimated to affect millions of Americans. As you’ve probably guessed, dry eyes occur when tears fail to provide enough natural lubrication for the eyes to be comfortable and healthy. Exactly what causes dry eyes can vary significantly, from side effects from medications to prolonged computer use. What is clear is that while the condition isn’t sight-threatening, it can make day to day life much harder than it needs to be. Fortunately, there are treatments that can help, and arguably one of the most effective is Lipiflow.

 

What is Lipiflow?

Lipiflow is a new technological solution that addresses the underlying cause of your dry eyes, rather than simply treating the symptoms. It is most effective at helping patients whose dry eyes are caused by meibomian gland dysfunction – a condition characterized by problems with the way that the meibomian glands produce the oil that forms an essential part of our tear film. The meibomian glands can become less productive, or in some cases, even blocked by hardened oil deposits. This prevents the oil from reaching your tear film, making it less effective. Lipiflow targets the meibomian glands, warming them to break down oily blockages and massaging your eyes to make sure that the oil, and then the tear film, is evenly dispersed. This helps to combat the symptoms associated with dry eyes, which can include:

  • Eye fatigue

  • Dry, scratchy and uncomfortable eyes

  • Blurred vision

  • Sensitivity to light

  • Difficulty wearing contact lenses
     

Your eye doctor will be able to advise you if Lipiflow has the potential to be a suitable solution for your dry eyes.
 

What to expect from Lipiflow treatment?

Lipiflow treatment is a simple, painless process that is performed in the comfort of your eye doctor’s office. There is no need for anesthetic. Once you are settled in your chair, your eye doctor will open the sterile, single-use applicators which are placed over your eyes. These are connected to a machine that causes the inner eyelids to heat to approximately 42.5°C to, while simultaneously placing gentle pressure on the outer eyelid surfaces. Lipiflow takes around 12 minutes per eye, during which time you can relax. You can even listen to music if you’d like to. There is no downtime, and patients can return to their usual activities right away. It takes around 3 days for patients to begin to see an improvement in their dry eye symptoms, although they may require further treatment in the future to maintain them. Optimal results are usually achieved around 6 to 8 weeks following your Lipiflow treatment.
 

For more information about Lipiflow, or to schedule a consultation to talk about this treatment for dry eyes, please contact our office.


Post-Surgical Contact Lenses

If you have recently undergone eye surgery, your eye doctor may recommend the use of post-surgical contact lenses as part of your recovery process. These specialized lenses are designed to aid in the healing and protection of your eyes after surgery.
 

Why Post-Surgical Contact Lenses May Be Necessary

 

After eye surgery, your eyes are in a delicate state and require extra care to ensure proper healing. Post-surgical contact lenses can play a crucial role in this process. These lenses act as a protective barrier, shielding your eyes from irritants such as dust, debris, and bright lights. They also help to maintain the shape of the cornea and aid in the prevention of infection. By wearing post-surgical contact lenses, you can minimize the risk of complications and promote a faster and smoother recovery.
 

Different Types of Post-Surgical Contact Lenses

 

There are various types of post-surgical contact lenses available, and the specific type recommended for you will depend on the nature of your surgery and your eye condition. One common type is the bandage contact lens, which is a soft, therapeutic lens that covers the cornea, providing protection and promoting healing.
 

Another type is scleral lenses, which is larger and covers a larger portion of the eye, providing enhanced protection and support. Your optometrist will determine the most suitable type of post-surgical contact lens for your individual needs.


Colored Contacts

Colored contacts have become increasingly popular over the years as a way to enhance your look and experiment with different eye colors. Whether you want to change your eye color for a special occasion or simply for everyday wear, colored contacts offer a fun and versatile option.
 

Different Types of Colored Contacts

 

When it comes to colored contacts, there are various types to choose from, depending on your preferences and needs. The three main categories are cosmetic, enhancement, and opaque lenses.
 

Cosmetic lenses are designed to completely change the color of your eyes. These lenses come in a wide range of shades, from natural hues such as blue, green, and brown, to more vibrant colors like purple, gray, and even red. Cosmetic lenses can create a dramatic transformation and give you the eye color you desire.
 

Enhancement lenses, on the other hand, are designed to enhance your natural eye color rather than change it completely. They add depth and intensity to your eyes, making them appear brighter and more vibrant. Enhancement lenses are ideal if you want a subtle change that enhances your natural beauty.
 

Opaque lenses are specifically designed to cover dark-colored eyes. They are ideal for individuals with naturally dark eyes who want to achieve a lighter or more vibrant eye color. Opaque lenses are often used in theatrical or costume applications as they can create a striking and captivating look.


Types of Daily Contact Lenses

Wearing contact lenses gives patients the flexibility and freedom to live life to the fullest, without some of the difficulties presented by wearing glasses. Many people who choose contact lenses do so because they don’t like the way that glasses look or feel, or because wearing glasses compromises their ability to perform certain tasks or activities, such as sports or jobs that require the use of safety goggles. 

There are lots of different contact lenses to choose from, with two of the most popular being daily disposables and toric lenses. 
 

Disposable Lenses

As their name suggests, these daily contact lenses are disposable. This means that they can and should be discarded at the end of each day rather than re-worn. Disposable lenses do tend to be a little more expensive than some repeat-wear varieties, but the benefits usually outweigh the cost. 

Some of the advantages of choosing daily disposable contact lenses include:

  • You don’t have to clean them, which saves patients a great deal of time and hassle. It also helps save money in terms of the ongoing cost of cleaning solution. 

  • Disposable lenses are also great for people with eye allergies. This is because with ordinary lenses, there’s an opportunity for deposits and microorganisms to build up. With daily disposables, allergens have less chance to attach themselves to the lenses and cause irritation and other allergy symptoms. 

  • You don’t need to schedule regular replacements either, which makes wearing contact lenses easier on your schedule. 

  • Disposable contact lenses are particularly good for people who have busy lives and are likely to cut corners when it comes to caring for their eyes or contacts since there is no cleaning or maintenance required.


Daily disposable contact lenses are available in a wide range of prescriptions, including those for patients with nearsightedness and farsightedness. Your eye doctor will be able to advise you if you are a candidate for disposable contact lenses. 
 

Toric Lenses

Toric contact lenses are recommended for patients who have a refractive eye problem called astigmatism. Patients with astigmatism have corneal abnormalities that cause the refraction of the eye to be different between the vertical and horizontal planes, causing blurred vision and difficulty seeing fine details. Toric contact lenses are shaped in a particular way that creates the different focusing powers needed in each part of the lens to correct your vision. For this reason, it’s essential that Toric lenses are placed into the eyes in the correct position.

Fortunately, manufacturers design Toric lenses with features that help them to stay in place, including:

  • Thin/thick zones

  • Creating areas of the lens that are thicker or heavier which helps secure it in position 

  • An area where the bottom of the lens is slightly cut off 


To keep them stable, Toric lenses are a little firmer than conventional soft lenses. This means that some patients can find them a little less comfortable, but the superior vision they obtain outweighs this. Your eye doctor will be able to advise you if you are a good candidate for Toric contact lenses and which variety would best suit you. 

To find out more about daily contact lenses, speak to our friendly and knowledgeable team. 


Surgical Co-Management

In the realm of eye care, surgical co-management has emerged as a collaborative approach that aims to provide patients with comprehensive and seamless treatment. This concept involves the joint efforts of optometrists and ophthalmologists, each bringing their unique expertise to the table. By working together, these eye care professionals strive to enhance patient outcomes and deliver exceptional care.
 

The Role of Optometrist and Ophthalmologist in Surgical Co-Management

 

Surgical co-management is built upon the unique skill sets and areas of expertise of optometrists and ophthalmologists. By understanding their respective roles, you can appreciate the synergy that this collaborative approach fosters.


Optometrists are primary eye care professionals who specialize in the examination, diagnosis, and non-surgical treatment of vision disorders. Their responsibilities in surgical co-management include:

  • Performing comprehensive eye examinations and evaluations

  • Monitoring and managing pre-existing eye conditions

  • Providing pre-operative and post-operative care

  • Educating patients on surgical procedures and aftercare

  • Collaborating with ophthalmologists to ensure continuity of care
     

Ophthalmologists are medical doctors who specialize in the diagnosis, treatment, and surgical management of eye diseases and disorders. Their role in surgical co-management encompasses:

  • Evaluating patients' candidacy for surgical interventions

  • Performing complex surgical procedures

  • Providing specialized medical and surgical care

  • Collaborating with optometrists to ensure seamless patient care

  • Monitoring and managing post-operative complications

  • By combining the expertise of optometrists and ophthalmologists, surgical co-management ensures that patients receive comprehensive and coordinated care throughout their treatment journey.

How Surgical Co-Management Works

 

Surgical co-management is a well-orchestrated process that involves several key steps. Understanding how it works can help you navigate this collaborative approach with confidence.

  • Initial Evaluation: The process typically begins with an optometrist conducting a comprehensive eye examination. During this evaluation, the optometrist assesses the patient's visual needs, identifies any potential issues, and determines if a surgical intervention is necessary.

  • Referral and Consultation: If surgery is recommended, the optometrist refers the patient to an ophthalmologist for further evaluation and consultation. This step ensures that the patient receives specialized medical advice and a thorough assessment of their suitability for the proposed surgical procedure.

  • Pre-operative Care: The optometrist plays a crucial role in providing pre-operative care, which may include managing any existing eye conditions, ensuring the patient understands the surgical process, and addressing any concerns or questions they may have.

  • Surgical Procedure: The ophthalmologist performs the necessary surgical intervention, leveraging their specialized training and expertise in surgical techniques.

  • Post-operative Care: After the surgery, the patient's care transitions back to the optometrist, who closely monitors the recovery process and provides post-operative care and management. This may involve follow-up appointments, monitoring for any complications, and ensuring the patient adheres to the prescribed treatment plan.

  • Ongoing Collaboration: Throughout the entire process, the optometrist and ophthalmologist maintain open communication and collaborate closely. This ensures that the patient's care is seamless, and any concerns or issues are promptly addressed by the appropriate healthcare professional.


Specialty Contact Lenses

Every patient is different and so are their eyes. This means that there need to be different types of contact lenses to suit each individual. Some patients have corneal abnormalities which mean that conventional lenses won’t sit comfortably on the surface of their eyes, while others suffer from eye conditions that mean normal contact lenses won’t be comfortable or could irritate their eyes. 

As you may have guessed from the name, specialty contact lenses are unconventional contacts that are designed for patients that regular contacts might not be suitable. Here are some of the main types of speciality contact lenses and who they are recommended for. 
 

Who might be a good patient for specialty contact lenses?

 

Some of the patients that might benefit from specialty contact lenses include those who:

  • have been diagnosed with dry eye syndrome

  • have corneal scarring

  • have been diagnosed with keratoconus, a condition characterized by the bulging of the cornea

  • suffer from strabismus, a condition where the patient has an eye that turns in or out relative to the other

  • have suffered an injury to the eye

  • suffer from a peripheral corneal thinning disorder

  • are intolerant to other types of lenses


Your eye doctor or contact lens provider will be able to tell you if you need specialty contact lenses and if so, which lenses would be best based on your individual requirements. 
 


Urgent Eye Care

 

Urgent eye care encompasses prompt evaluation and treatment of sudden or severe eye-related issues, including foreign object removal, chemical exposure, corneal abrasions, sudden vision loss, eye trauma, acute glaucoma, chemical burns, and eye infections. Seeking immediate professional attention from an optometrist is vital to prevent further damage and preserve vision.
 

Common Eye Emergencies or Urgent Eye Care Appointments

 

Eye emergencies can manifest in various forms, and it is essential to be able to identify them quickly. Some common eye emergencies include:
 

  • Foreign Object in the Eye: Particles, debris, or small objects can become lodged in the eye, causing pain, redness, tearing, and potential damage to the eye's surface.

  • Corneal Abrasions or Scratches: Injuries to the cornea, such as abrasions or scratches, can cause severe eye pain, light sensitivity, and a feeling of something in the eye.

  • Sudden Loss of Vision: Any sudden and unexplained loss of vision requires immediate attention to determine the underlying cause and initiate appropriate treatment.

  • Eye Trauma or Blunt Force Injury: Injuries to the eye from impact, trauma, or accidents can lead to serious complications, including retinal detachment, hemorrhage, or intraocular foreign bodies.

  • Chemical Burns: Exposure to caustic substances or chemicals can cause serious damage to the eyes, resulting in pain, redness, and potential vision loss.

  • Eye Infections: Infections such as conjunctivitis (pink eye) can cause redness, discharge, and discomfort in the eyes.
     

Recognizing these symptoms and seeking urgent care can prevent further complications.
 

The Importance of Basic Red Eye Exams in Urgent Care

 

Red eye exams are a fundamental part of urgent eye care. They help identify the cause of redness and determine the appropriate treatment. Basic red eye exams involve a comprehensive evaluation of the eye, including examining the eyelids, conjunctiva, cornea, and iris. These exams aid in the diagnosis and treatment of various conditions, such as conjunctivitis, uveitis, dry eyes, and corneal abrasions.