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CLE

Clear Lens Extraction (CLE) is a surgical procedure that involves the removal of the natural lens of the eye and replacing it with an artificial lens implant, also known as an intraocular lens (IOL). CLE is primarily performed to correct refractive errors, such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism.
 

Understanding CLE and How It Works

 

Clear Lens Extraction is similar to cataract surgery, where the natural lens is removed and replaced with an IOL. However, in CLE, the lens is clear and not clouded as in the case of cataracts. The procedure begins with the administration of local anesthesia to numb the eye and ensure a painless experience for the patient.
 

Once the eye is numb, a small incision is made on the cornea, which is the clear front surface of the eye. Through this incision, your eye surgeon accesses the lens and carefully removes it. The artificial IOL is then inserted into the empty lens capsule. The IOL is specifically chosen to correct the patient's refractive error, providing them with improved vision.
 

After the IOL is implanted, the incision is closed with tiny sutures or self-sealing techniques. Following the surgery, patients are usually prescribed antibiotic and anti-inflammatory eye drops to prevent infection and reduce inflammation.
 

Factors to Consider Before Undergoing Clear Lens Extraction

 

Before deciding to undergo Clear Lens Extraction, there are several factors that need to be considered. Firstly, it is crucial to have a thorough eye examination to determine if you are a suitable candidate for the procedure. Your optometrist will evaluate your overall eye health and discuss your expectations and goals for vision correction.
 

Age is another important factor to consider. CLE is typically recommended for individuals over the age of 40 who have developed presbyopia, a condition that affects near vision. It is also important to have stable vision, as any changes in prescription can affect the accuracy of the IOL power calculation.
 

Additionally, it is essential to understand the potential risks and complications associated with the procedure. While CLE is generally safe, there is a small risk of infection, bleeding, and retinal detachment. Your optometrist will discuss these risks with you and address any concerns you may have.


Lens Technology

Thanks to the advancement of lens technology, glasses lenses are no longer a single, one size fits all solution. There are a variety of different lens types that can be used in glasses, giving patients greater flexibility and control over their vision than ever before.
 

Single Vision Lenses

Also known as monovision lenses, these lenses are designed to correct the wearer’s vision at just one distance, and have a single prescription covering the entire surface of the lens. They are most often recommended for people who are either nearsighted (myopia) or farsighted (hyperopia) and who need glasses for a specific activity, such as driving or reading.
 

Progressive Lenses

Progressive lenses are multifocal lenses that can correct a patient’s vision at different working distances, ranging from far distance to reading distance. However, rather than designating different areas on the lenses for different distances with visible lines separating them, progressive lenses have a gradual change so that the wearer can smoothly transition from one lens power to another.
 

Bifocal and Trifocal Lenses

As you may have guessed from the name, bifocal and trifocal lenses have either two or three lens powers depending on which type you choose. Bifocal lenses support distance vision in the top half of the lens, and near vision in the lower half. Trifocal lenses support distance vision in the top third of the lens, intermediate vision in the middle segment and near vision in the bottom third. Whichever variety you choose, you will see visible lines separating each segment.

Bifocal and trifocal lenses are recommended for patients who are near or farsighted, and those who develop presbyopia, which is the natural hardening of the eye lens, that occurs as we get older. Presbyopia makes it harder for the lens of the eye to adapt to focus at different distances.
 

Multifocal Lenses

Multifocal lenses are the alternative name given to bifocal, trifocal and progressive lenses.
 

Computer Lenses

Computer lenses are prescription lenses that are specifically designed to be worn when doing computer work. This is because they place the optimum lens power for viewing your computer screen exactly where you need it – which is closer than intermediate vision, but further away than reading material is usually held. Wearing computer lenses can significantly reduce the negative effects caused by the high visual demands of computer work, including blurred vision, redness, dry eyes, double vision and dizziness.
 

Transition Lenses

Also known as photochromic lenses, transition lenses are a special type of lens that darken when in the sunlight and lighten when in softer light or the dark. This versatility gives the wearer the convenience of being able to move between different environments without needing to change their glasses. This makes them extremely cost effective and prevent the wearer from needing to take multiple pairs of glasses out with them. Transition lenses also filter out many of the harmful UV rays that are emitted from the sun, helping to keep eyes healthy too. They are ideal for people who spend a lot of time going between inside and outside, or who work outside in varying weather conditions.
 

Blue Light Lenses

Blue light lenses are specially crafted lenses that contain filters that block out much of the artificial blue light that is produced by digital devices like computers, smartphones and tablets. Natural blue light is actually good for balancing our sleep-wake cycle, boosting our mood and enhancing our cognitive abilities so that we can function better day to day. However, too much blue light, especially from artificial sources, can have the opposite effect. Many people who fail to use blue light lenses can go on to develop digital eye strain, which produces symptoms like eye fatigue, dry eyes, blurred vision, headaches and more. Blue light lenses are recommended for anyone who spends a lot of time working on a digital device.
 

Polarized Lenses

Polarized lenses are used to reduce eyestrain and improve the quality of vision in patients on especially sunny days, making them ideal for anyone who spends a lot of time outdoors. They can do this because they have a special filter that blocks some of the light from passing through the lens. Vertical light is allowed to pass through, while horizontal light, such as that which bounces off of water and can be blinding, is blocked. Polarized lenses are most often used in sunglasses since they are worn outdoors, and the wearer also needs to protect their eyes from UV damage.

Still have questions about which lens is right for you? Contact us to schedule an eye exam or an appointment to evaluate your individual needs.


Optos

As technology continues to advance, so does the field of the optometric industry. The development of innovative tools and techniques has allowed for more accurate and comprehensive examinations. One such technology is Optos, a revolutionary system that utilizes ultra-widefield retinal imaging technology to provide optometrists with a detailed view of the entire retina.
 

How Does Optos Work?

 

Optos technology is based on the principle of ultra-widefield retinal imaging, which allows for a wider and more detailed view of the retina compared to traditional imaging techniques. The Optos system consists of a specialized camera that captures high-resolution images of the retina using scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) technologies. SLO provides a wide-field view of the retina, while OCT allows for cross-sectional imaging, providing valuable insights into the various layers of the retina.
 

The Optos camera is designed to capture images through a process called optomap, which captures up to 200 degrees of the retina in a single image. This wide-field view provides optometrists with a comprehensive picture of the retina, enabling them to detect abnormalities that may not be visible with traditional imaging techniques. The optomap image can be instantly viewed and analyzed by your eye doctor, allowing for a more efficient and accurate diagnosis.
 

Common Eye Conditions Detected by Optos

 

Optos technology has the capability to detect a wide range of eye conditions, including but not limited to, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, glaucoma, and retinal tears or detachments. Diabetic retinopathy is a condition that affects individuals with diabetes, causing damage to the blood vessels in the retina. Optos can capture detailed images of the retina, enabling optometrists to detect any signs of diabetic retinopathy and initiate appropriate treatment.
 

Macular degeneration is another common eye condition that can be detected using Optos. This condition affects the macula, the central part of the retina responsible for sharp, central vision. Optos allows for a comprehensive view of the macula, identifying any changes or abnormalities that may indicate the presence of macular degeneration.
 

Glaucoma, a condition characterized by damage to the optic nerve, can also be detected using Optos. The wide-field view provided by Optos allows for a thorough examination of the optic nerve and the surrounding structures, facilitating early detection and intervention.
 

Finally, Optos technology is particularly effective in detecting retinal tears or detachments. These conditions can lead to sudden vision loss and require immediate medical attention. Optos allows for a comprehensive view of the retina, identifying any signs of retinal tears or detachments and initiate prompt treatment.


Eyelid Hygiene

Eyelid hygiene is an essential aspect of maintaining optimal eye health. Your eyes are sensitive organs that require proper care and attention. Neglecting eyelid hygiene can lead to various problems, including dry eye.
 

Recognizing the Symptoms of Eyelid Problems

 

It is crucial to recognize the symptoms of eyelid problems to seek timely treatment and prevent further complications. Common symptoms of eyelid issues include redness, swelling, itching, irritation, crusting or scaling of the eyelids, sensitivity to light, and a sensation of something in the eye.
 

The Importance of Eyelid Hygiene in Maintaining Eye Health

 

 

Maintaining proper eyelid hygiene is essential for overall eye health. Regularly cleaning your eyelids helps remove debris, bacteria, and excess oil, preventing infections and inflammation. It also promotes the proper functioning of the meibomian glands, ensuring an adequate supply of tears to keep your eyes moisturized. By incorporating eyelid hygiene into your daily routine, you can significantly reduce the risk of developing dry eye and other eye-related problems.


Optomap

Optomap is an innovative new technology that gives eye doctors the ability to perform ultra-wide retinal imaging that is far superior to what can currently be achieved using conventional retinal imaging options. In contrast to conventional retinal imaging, Optomap captures at least 50% more of the retina in a single capture, and with Optomap’s multi-capture function, up to 97% of the retina can be viewed. This gives eye care professionals greater opportunity to monitor the health and condition of patient vision.
 

Why is Optomap important?

Optomap is another great preventative eyecare technology tool. By allowing your eye doctor to have a comprehensive view of your retina, they will be able to detect any developing eye diseases early on, before they have a detrimental impact on your vision and day to day life. Not only can Optomap detect eye conditions such as retinal holes, retinal detachment, macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy, but it can also be used to identify some general health conditions such as cardiovascular disease, stroke and cancer.
 

What to expect from Optomap scanning

Optomap is a fast, painless and non-invasive procedure that is suitable for patients of all ages, even children and pregnant women. Many patients require their eyes to be dilated ahead of the scan and will be given eyedrops which will widen their pupils and make it easier for the camera to see the structures inside the eye. Pupil dilation is painless, but patients may feel more sensitive to light both during their Optomap scan and afterwards for up to 24 hours. You may also have slightly blurred vision for a few hours. Once your eyes are dilated, you’ll be sat down and asked to look into a small device that will take the pictures of your retina. A short flash of light will let you know that the image has been taken, and the entire imaging is over in just a few seconds. The results will be sent digitally to your eye doctor who will then evaluate them. The results will also be stored on your personal optical record for future information.  
 

If you would like more information about what is involved in Optomap, or to schedule an appointment for this effective screening technology, please contact our eyecare team.


Optical Coherence Tomography

Optical Coherence Tomography is a non-invasive imaging test that may be performed as a standard part of your regular, comprehensive exams, or you may be able to request this test as an addition to your usual exam.
 

Optical Coherence Tomography uses light waves to take cross-section images of your retina, which is the area of light-sensitive cells at the back of your eye that is responsible for receiving light and transmitting it into messages that are sent up to the brain. The technology behind OCT enables your eye doctor to see each of the different layers that make up the retina. By being able to see these and measure them, they can obtain a much clearer picture of the overall health and condition of your eyes.
 

Why are Optical Coherence Tomography scans important?

 

When you choose to have an OCT scan at fairly regular intervals, such as during your normal comprehensive eye exams, your eye doctor can compare newer results to previous ones. This helps them to build up a picture of the health of your eyes, and spot any changes which may be concerning, early, before they cause symptoms or have a permanent effect on your vision. 
 

Anyone can have an OCT scan, but they are particularly recommended for patients over the age of 25 who are concerned about the health of their eyes, or who are at risk of or already have diabetes, glaucoma or a family history of eye disease. This is because they can be used to spot the early signs of a range of eye diseases, including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, disorders of the optic nerve and more – even before you realize that you are affected.
 


EnChroma Lens Technology

If you find it difficult to tell colors apart, you may be color blind. Color blindness, or color deficiency, is estimated to affect around 8% of men and about 1% of women, but for those affected, it can significantly impact the quality of their day-to-day life. Contrary to popular belief, being color blind doesn’t mean that you can’t see any color at all. Instead, patients simply struggle to differentiate between certain colors. The vast majority of people who are color blind find it impossible to tell the difference between varying shades of red and green. You may hear this referred to as red-green color deficiency. However, this doesn’t only mean that they mix up red and green. They can also mix up colors that have some green or red light as part of their whole colors, for example purple and blue. This is because they are unable to see the red light that forms part of the color purple. 


As you can probably imagine, this type of visual impairment can be a problem for things like traffic lights, taking medications and even looking at signs and directions. For example, someone who is color blind may find that the green on a traffic light may appear white or even blue.
 

EnChroma lens technology is specifically designed to counteract red-green color deficiency and enable patients to better identify the difference in these colors or shades. They do this by selectively filtering out the red and green wavelengths of light at the exact point where the color sensitivities overlap before hitting the retina, creating far greater contrast between the colors so that the patient can distinguish between them successfully. Most cases of color blindness respond well to EnChroma’s innovative spectral lens technology, giving patients the ability to experience life in bright, vibrant technicolor.


EnChroma lenses are made from leading edge, Trivex material, and this helps to give them the best possible quality and clarity of vision. These lenses are also extremely light, strong and offer patients 100% protection against UV light, helping to keep your eyes healthy as well as improving your vision.


If you or someone you know is color blind or color deficient and could benefit from EnChroma lenses, contact us today to learn more about how they can help!

 


Visual Field

Visual field testing is an important part of most standard comprehensive eye exams. Also sometimes known as perimetry testing, Visual field testing is a method to measure the entire scope of vision of an individual, including their peripheral/side vision.
 

The importance of visual field testing

Visual field testing is one of the most effective diagnostic treatments in the detection of glaucoma. This is because when patients are affected by glaucoma, it is usually the peripheral vision that is affected by their condition first. However, it can also be used to detect central or peripheral retinal diseases, eyelid conditions such as drooping, optic nerve damage and conditions that affect the visual pathways from the optic nerve to the area of the brain where this information is processed into vision.
 

Visual field testing is also an important part of monitoring for people who are considered to be at risk for vision loss from disease and other problems, including those who have been diagnosed with the following:

  • Multiple sclerosis

  • Hyperthyroidism

  • Pituitary gland disorders

  • Central nervous system problems (such as a tumor that may be pressing on the brain)

  • Stroke

  • Diabetes

  • High blood pressure
     

What to expect from visual field testing

There are a variety of methods that can be used to perform visual field testing, including:
 

Static automated perimetry. This is where a machine is used to quantify how well the patient is able to detect flashing lights of varying size and brightness in different areas of their visual field, while they concentrate on a central point. The patient responds by pushing a button when they see the light.

Kinetic perimetry. This involves points of light that are fixed in size and intensity and are presented along the patient’s peripheral vision, before being gradually moved inwards to determine their field of vision. 

Visual field testing is non-invasive, painless and doesn’t require patients to have their eyes dilated. The results, which are usually presented in a series of charts, are digital and sent directly to your eye doctor for interpretation. Depending on the outcome of your results, you may be recommended for further diagnostic testing which could include blood tests. If you have been diagnosed with glaucoma, you will probably be recommended to have several visual field tests each year, which will help your eye doctor to monitor the progression of your condition and recommend treatments to slow it.

If you would like more information about visual field testing, or if you have concerns about your peripheral vision, please don’t hesitate to schedule an appointment with our experienced and knowledgeable eyecare team today.


Dry Eye Advanced Diagnostic Testing

Dry eye is a common ocular condition that occurs when the eyes do not produce enough tears or when the tears evaporate too quickly. This can lead to discomfort, redness, blurred vision, and even damage to the surface of the eyes. Understanding the causes and symptoms of dry eye is crucial provide early detection and effective treatment.
 

The Importance of Dry Eye Advanced Diagnostic Testing

 

Early detection of dry eye is crucial for preventing further progression of the condition and improving patient outcomes. Without proper diagnosis and treatment, dry eye can cause significant discomfort and affect daily activities. Additionally, chronic dry eye can lead to corneal ulcers, infections, and even vision loss. By accurately identifying and addressing dry eye in its early stages, optometrists can provide timely interventions and prevent complications.
 

TearLab

 

One of the advanced diagnostic tools available for dry eye is TearLab. TearLab is a non-invasive test that measures the osmolarity of tears, which is an indicator of tear film stability. This test provides valuable information about the quality and quantity of tears, allowing healthcare professionals to accurately diagnose and monitor dry eye. By analyzing the osmolarity of tears, TearLab helps identify the severity of dry eye and guides treatment decisions. It is a quick and painless procedure that can be performed in a clinical setting.
 

InflammaDry

 

Inflammation plays a significant role in dry eye, and identifying the presence of inflammation is crucial for effective treatment. InflammaDry is a diagnostic tool that detects elevated levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), an inflammatory marker, in tears. By measuring MMP-9, InflammaDry helps optometrists differentiate between inflammatory and non-inflammatory dry eye. This information is essential for tailoring treatment plans and determining the most appropriate therapies for each patient.


Hybrid Contacts

Contact lenses have become a popular choice for individuals who want to correct their vision without the hassle of wearing glasses. Traditional contact lenses have been around for decades, offering a convenient alternative to eyeglasses. However, advancements in technology have given rise to a new type of contact lens – hybrid contacts.
 

What Are Hybrid Contacts?

 

Hybrid contacts are a revolutionary type of contact lens that combine the best features of both soft and rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses. The rigid center corrects vision by providing precise clarity, while the soft skirt offers comfort and stability. This unique combination allows for the benefits of both types of lenses to be experienced simultaneously.
 

The central RGP lens of a hybrid contact is made from a rigid material that allows oxygen to pass through to the cornea, ensuring ample oxygen supply to the eyes. This ensures the overall health of the eyes, preventing dryness and reducing the risk of complications associated with limited oxygen flow